AttaHalilintar

Top 4 YouTubers across Southeast Asia You May Want to Know

Lately, the industry has been more separated into two sides, the conventional and the modern one. Everyone can become an artist or influencer with the power of social media. The entertainment industry has been moving to a more practical solution such as social media, which gained more attention towards the young generation. With that being said, ASEANYouth.net has prepared a comprehensive list of some of the top Southeast Asian YouTubers you may want to know if you want to keep up to date with the latest trend and activities around the world!

  1. Atta Halilintar
Who is Atta Halilintar? - Quora
Atta Halilintar https://www.anakkost.tv/

Born in Riau, Indonesia, Atta Halilintar is one of the most successful Indonesian artists coming from Youtube. To this date, he has more than 26 million subscribers on Youtube. Often seen wearing his trademark headband and sunglasses, Atta mostly posts vlogs, interviews with celebrities, and celebrity house tours. He often includes messages about not giving up and describes how he built his career from zero. 

Since elementary school, Atta has been actively involved in helping the economic burden of his family by selling many kinds of food in his school, from bread, sandwiches, and even kid toys. By the age of 11th, he sells various tech stuff such as phone cards, phones, and successfully opened a phone store by himself. His success continues as he gets his first one million Rupiah (~US$71,216) when he was still 13 years old.

2. JianHao Tan

JianHao Tan - Bio, Facts, Family Life of Singaporean YouTuber
JianHao Tan https://www.thefamouspeople.com/

JianHao Tan is a Singaporean YouTuber, actor, and radio personality. Widely known in Asia, he posts funny and motivational videos on his channel. He usually pokes fun at locals, delivers relationship advice, and empathizes with students. A graduate of United Nations International School of Hanoi, Tan is a multitalented personality. His acting and comedic skills are brilliant and so is his way of presentation. Tan also owns a social media advertising agency that specializes in video and content production. A former army man, the Singaporean YouTuber has now built a career for himself as a social media influencer across various platforms. 

JianHao Tan (born 14 June 1993) is a Singaporean YouTuber and the chief executive officer of Titan Digital Media. As of 2 June 2020, he has more than four million subscribers on YouTube and close to 650,000 followers on Instagram. Throughout his YouTube career, he has collaborated with various Singaporean content creators such as Dee Kosh and Ryan Sylvia. In an interview with 8 Days that was published in 2018, JianHao shared that he made a six-digit annual income from YouTube alone.

3. Ranz Kyle & Niana Guerrero

inkl - Get to know Ranz Kyle and Niana Guerrero, Pinoy YouTube stars on the  rise - Rappler
Ranz Kyle & Niana Guerrero https://www.inkl.com/

Ranz Kyle is a well-known Filipino dancer and internet sensation famous for his self-titled channel on YouTube. He is also popular for being one half of the dance duo ‘Ranz and Niana’, the other half being his step-sister Niana Guerrero. He is also a member of the dance troupe Chicser. Born in San Juan City of Philippines, Kyle first came into the limelight after posting his dance video on Chris Brown’s song ‘I Should’ve Kissed You.’ He then went to become a YouTube star with a fan base of over 4.2 million subscribers (as of May 2018). 

The young dancer is incredibly popular on other social media platforms as well. He has accumulated over 2.2 million and over 712k subscribers on Instagram and Twitter respectively. In addition to these, his Facebook account has more than 4.5m followers. A graduate of Don Bosco Technical College Mandaluyong, Kyle is currently living the life of his dreams. He is already enjoying a successful career as a dancer and an internet sensation. Apart from his professional endeavors, he makes it a point to spend some quality time with his family members.

4. Uncle Roger (Nigel Ng)

Hello Disappointed GIF by Nigel Ng (Uncle Roger) - Find & Share on GIPHY
Uncle Roger https://giphy.com/

The latest one is one of the most popular among the Asian people overseas. Uncle Roger or goes by the name of Nigel Ng is a Malaysian comedian who goes viral lately. One of the most popular videos by him is his comments on BBC’s food presenter’s style of cooking rice. The 29-year-old went viral globally for his portrayal of Uncle Roger, a middle-aged Asian man reviewing an egg fried rice video. At the beginning of 2021, he had amassed over 157,899,974 views on his YouTube channel, 1m followers on Instagram, and 97.7k followers on Twitter. He currently has 3.18m subscribers on his YouTube channel.

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Ushering in the New Year with Festivals

A new year is a fresh start, brimming with hope, opportunities and possibilities. What better way to celebrate the new year than literally soaking in the festive atmosphere with others at a new year festival? Festivals are not only celebrations of humanity and life but also expressions of cultures and traditions. Want to know a country better? Then be sure to join the locals in one of their festivals for unforgettable fun and meaningful experiences.

Heart Evangelista. Source: Mega

ASEAN Celebrities: Then and Now

However, in this age of digital distribution, no longer do the music and movie industry reign supreme. Nowadays, celebrities come from social media networks, streaming platforms, and many other different sites. In fact, artists now have to maintain an active social media account in order to ‘make it’ in the industry or simply expand their audience base.

Hawker Centre

Hawker Centre – A Place We Call a Second Home

What do you first imagine when you think of Singapore? Maybe you will think of the iconic lion statue in Merlion Park, Marina Bay Sands, and a paradise for foodie travelers who want to try various Asian foods. A place that is undoubtedly a must for those of you who want to taste a variety of foods, of course, is the Hawker Centre.

Hawker Centres has been a part of Singapore’s life day-to-day basis, becoming one of  Singaporean well-known cultures and heritages. In short, the Hawker Centres is an open-air complex and food court most commonly found in Singapore. They are typically found throughout the city-state, located near public housing estates or transport hubs (such as bus interchanges or train stations).

ALSO READ: Exploring Singapore’s Historical Kallang River

It houses many stalls that offer various food from different immigrant groups who settled in Singapore since the 1960s, from Malay, Chinese, Indian, and various other types of food. A typical Hawker Centres comprises numerous food and drink stalls and a shared seating area. There is an old saying that  “If you haven’t come to a Hawker Centre, you haven’t really gone to Singapore.”

Several Hawker Centres in Singapore had been running for more than decades, passed on from several generations who still maintain the standard, quality, and originality of the food they serve. Even some of them still serve the customers in their retirement age. One of them is Grandma Leong, who owns Nam Seng Wonton Noodles. 

(Image Source: SingaporeBestFoods)

Even in her 90s, she wakes up every day at 4.30 AM to buy some ingredients at the wet market. Although she hires employees to help on the cooking side, she insists on working on some miscellaneous tasks. Grandma Leong may be old, but her memory is not at all. She could remember up to 10 orders at a time, which proves that her memory remains sharp. 

As her stalls get more popular, she needs to adapt to it. Until now, she can serve customers in 3 languages. “Nĭ hăo, Hello, Nei seung sik mat ye? What do you want? Nǐ xiǎng chī shénme?” as she demonstrates speaking in English, Mandarin, and Cantonese at the same time. Grandma Leong is one of the legendary chefs at Hawker Centres who has survived more than 60 years serving customers. “I’m not that fierce. If I’m fierce, how can I be here for 60 years?” she said. 

Hawker Centre is where many hawkers offer various foods, from Chinese, Malay, Indian, Thai, and many more. Some of the stalls are even older than Singapore’s independence age. Many old stalls have been passed to the younger generation while still maintaining the food’s originality & the way it cooked. 

From being a street-side stall on Sago Street before 1983 to the present day hawker stall at Chinatown Complex Food Centre, Ah Sau has been serving my favorite Ikan Bilis Yong Tau Foo breakfast since I was born!

Yip Yew Chong, Artist.

One of them is Thomas. A third-generation hawker at Koh Brother Pig’s Organ Soup in Tiong Bahru Market. This stall has been around since 1955. When his grandfather decided to retire, he decided to take over the booth so that the legendary stall remains. “One of the main reasons I decided to take over this business is because my grandfather started this from a pushcart. It is 63 years of hard work. I think it’s really a waste to let it go, so I decided to take it over.”

2020 is certainly not a friendly year for hawkers. The anticipation of COVID-19 from the Government of Singapore resulted in a drastic decrease in visitors to the Hawker Centres. This difficulty gave rise to the Hawkers United movement – a Facebook group under the name of “Hawkers United – Dabao 2020 -” created by Melvin Chew, a hawker at Jin Ji Teochew Braised Duck. His goal is to help hawkers and customers to connect and arrange takeaway food orders and home delivery. 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/HawkersUnited2020/
(Image Source: Vulcanpost)

Covid causes a lot of changes in our local hawkers and food and beverage industry. A lot of businesses closed down because of COVID-19. But at the same time, more hawkers start to realize the importance of engaging technology, digitalize systems during the pandemic, and so forth.

– Melvin Chew

According to Melvin, after many hawkers and customers joined the group, it has saved many hawkers and made them still in business through this unprecedented time. To this date, the group has more than 270 thousand hawkers and customers who want to connect and discover new foods.

He pointed out that positive strength by all hawkers can help and lead us to overtime this pandemic. “If everyone is united by obeying laws and personal hygiene, then we will be safe, and the pandemic will end soon. .. Be united and help each other without any food politics and selfishness..” he added. 

Hawker Centres is not just a place to eat. Still, a community of all Singaporeans, young to old, from unemployed to bosses, local and tourist – all come together in this place to share laughter and stories, and will certainly be a memory in the future. Many celebrities or even politicians pick this “community dining room” to meet local people and enjoy the typical Singaporean food taste.

Some world-class celebrities & politicians are enjoying hawker cultures. Top row (left to right): Justin Trudeau, Gordon Ramsay. Bottom row (left to right): Joe Biden, Hugh Jackman. 
(Image Source: MSNews)

The vibrant Hawker Culture in Singapore that we enjoy today results from the support of many – the hawkers, community groups, organizations, Government, and Singaporeans who patronize them. Together, they have helped make the Hawker Culture in Singapore an integral part of Singapore’s living.

Until now, there are more than 110 Hawker Centre in Singapore and will increase over time as the Lion City actively pushes the hawker culture to become a UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Hawker Culture is very much associated with its Hawker Centres, which serve as important social spaces for community interaction in this half-sized Los Angeles city. 

Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong states that the hawker centre is a community dining room that is a unique part of its heritage and identity. For that, this lion city is intensively promoting this Hawker Culture. Pledge your support here for the nomination of Hawker Culture in Singapore for UNESCO’s Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage today!

If you haven’t come to a Hawker Centre, you haven’t really gone to Singapore.”

Hawker Centres has been a part of Singapore’s life day-to-day basis, becoming one of  Singaporean well-known cultures and heritages. In short, the Hawker Centres is an open-air complex and food court most commonly found in Singapore. They are typically found throughout the city-state, located near public housing estates or transport hubs (such as bus interchanges or train stations).

Hawker Centres is not just a place to eat. Still, a community of all Singaporeans, young to old, from unemployed to bosses, local and tourist – all come together in this place to share laughter and stories, and will certainly be a memory in the future. Many celebrities or even politicians pick this “community dining room” to meet local people and enjoy the typical Singaporean food taste.

Until now, there are more than 110 Hawker Centres across Singapore and will increase over time as the Lion City actively pushes the hawker culture to become a UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Hawker Culture is very much associated with its Hawker Centres, which serve as important social spaces for community interaction in this half-sized Los Angeles city. 


Written by Juandi

Juandi is a content writer for ASEAN Youth Organization, where he publishes content related to ASEAN country’s relations and events. He was born in the capital city of Indonesia, Jakarta, and has lived most of his life there. At 19 years old, he is currently studying at one of Indonesia’s top universities, Tarumanagara University, majoring in Business Accounting. He is currently working for one of the top esports startup companies in Singapore, IMPLS Ent.


fests

Festivals: From the People, to the People.

It’s been a cumbersome year for all of us, and we’re sure that you’re longing to go out attending festivals. The ecstasy is unlike any other. Well, a new year, a new dream. Hopefully by this year, we can finally acquire a way to beat the pandemic, thus making us able to go out safely.

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Food – Our Common Ground

Food is more important than we think. It fulfils a basic human need for sustenance – rich or poor, young or old – we all need food to survive. Food connects people. Enjoying a meal together with others helps to build and maintain relationships necessary for us to thrive. A universal language, food is a common thread that binds humanity in an increasingly fractured and divided world.

Source: UNWTO

Towards Sustainable Tourism in ASEAN

Sustainable tourism is defined by the World Tourism Organization as “tourism that takes full account of its current and future economic, social and environmental impacts, addressing the needs of visitors, the industry, the environment and host communities.” In other words, tourism-driven growth should not be achieved at the expense of the well-being of people and the planet.